Our methods are effective in preventing health complications. 

We do Pap Smear and HPV test during our well women exam.

Pap Smear is used to determine malignancy. HPV is used to determine the presence of HPV virus that is linked to future incidence of cervical cancer that can lead to malignancy.  This post is for explaining HPV test.

The human papilloma virus (HPV) test detects the presence of the human papillomavirus, a virus that can lead to the development of genital warts, abnormal cervical cells or cervical cancer. 

The HPV test is a screening test for cervical cancer, but the test doesn't tell you whether you have cancer. Instead, the test detects the presence of HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer, in your system. Certain types of HPV — including types 16 and 18 — increase your cervical cancer risk. Knowing whether you have a type of HPV that puts you at high risk of cervical cancer means that you and your doctor can better decide on the next steps in your health care. Those steps might include follow-up monitoring, further testing, or treatment of abnormal or precancerous cells.

 

Results

Results from your HPV test will come back as either positive or negative.

  • Positive HPV test. A positive test result means that you have a type of high-risk HPV that's linked to cervical cancer. It doesn't mean that you have cervical cancer now, but it's a warning sign that cervical cancer could develop in the future. Your doctor will probably recommend a follow-up test in a year to see if the infection has cleared or to check for signs of cervical cancer.
  • Negative HPV test. A negative test result means that you don't have any of the types of HPV that cause cervical cancer.

Depending on your test results, your doctor may recommend one of the following as a next step:

  • Normal monitoring. If you're over age 30, your HPV test is negative and your Pap test is normal, you'll follow the generally recommended schedule for repeating both tests in five years.
  • Colposcopy. In this follow-up procedure, your doctor uses a special magnifying lens (colposcope) to more closely examine your cervix.
  • Biopsy. In this procedure, sometimes done in conjunction with colposcopy, your doctor takes a sample of cervical cells (biopsy) to be examined more closely under a microscope.
  • Removal of abnormal cervical cells. To prevent abnormal cells from developing into cancerous cells, your doctor may suggest a procedure to remove the areas of tissue that contain the abnormal cells.
  • Seeing a specialist. If your Pap test or HPV test results are abnormal, your health care provider will probably refer you to a gynecologist for a colposcopic exam. If test results show that you might have cancer, you may be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating cancers of the female genital tract (gynecologic oncologist) for treatment.

If pap or HPV test is positive, we typically have patient come back to office and choose appropriate care plan.